Apple iOS 9 Security Features

Apple’s September Event 2015 takes place today so 9/9 = iOS 9 announcements.

Apple is promising improved security with iOS 9. Implementing six-digit passcodes for Touch ID is one well publicized example.

iOS 9 improved security

Source: Apple

Security researcher Frederic Jacobs has an excellent summary of other documented changes on Medium.

A small change that I’ve noticed while testing iOS 9’s public beta is related to Windows¹.

This is the prompt you’ll see when connecting an iOS 9 device to a computer with iTunes installed (which includes anything running OS X).

And this is the prompt you’ll see when connecting an iOS 9 device to a (Windows) computer with no iTunes drivers installed.

iOS 9, Allow this device to access photos and videos?

Allow this device to access photos and videos?

It’s a subtle but interesting difference. Allow implies limited access, whereas trust implies something greater. There have been cross-platform malware attempts aimed at iOS in the past. With this allow prompt, a careful observer could determine when such cross-platform malware is present. If you connect your iOS 9 device to a Windows computer that you know doesn’t have iTunes installed and are asked to trust… don’t.

Another small but very welcome change that I wrote about in July is a new Safari feature.

Scam sites attempting to lock Safari into an endless loop of JavaScript alert dialogs will find their efforts foiled by Safari’s new option to “Block Alerts”.

iOS 9 Safari, Block alerts from?

Block alerts from?

All in all iOS 9 looks good. I hope to see some more security info during Apple’s event today, and I’m looking forward to iOS 9’s public release scheduled for September 16th.

@5ean5ullivan

¹ Testing with Kali Linux yielded a “trust” prompt.



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